Nelson's Tohu Wines received one of the 50 Best in Show awards for its Whenua Matua Chardonnay at the 2021 Decanter Wine Awards.

Provided

Nelson’s Tohu Wines received one of the 50 Best in Show awards for its Whenua Matua Chardonnay at the 2021 Decanter Wine Awards.

The value of New Zealand wine exports reached $ 600 million in the September quarter, up 9% from the same period last year, with no signs of slowing down.

New Zealand Winegrowers chief executive Philip Gregan said international demand was high, which is reflected in its price per liter, which also rose 4%.

The demand proved that the distinctive flavors, quality and durability of New Zealand wine resonate with global consumers, he said.

The 2021 vintage was exceptional in all wine regions of the country, while the overall harvest was much lower than expected, down 19% from last year’s harvest of 370,000 tonnes of grapes. The reduction in supply was reflected in the decrease in the volume of exports for the year to date, which was down 3% from last year.

READ MORE:
* Nelson’s Tohu Wines New Zealand toast
* Vintage 2021: Marlborough down 21%, smaller harvest in six years
* Are we facing a shortage of wine?

“Successfully managing the market impacts of the resulting supply constraints is a key objective for many players in the New Zealand wine industry. Wineries face tough decisions about who they can supply in their key markets. “

SABIN STREAM

Wake up among the vines, and the day improves from there.

The cost of production had increased and the lingering effects of Covid-19 on the border and markets, as well as limited supply chains, had continued to affect producers and wineries.

The shortage of skilled workers was expected to continue as long as borders remained closed, which was a major concern for the sector as seasonal workers played a critical role in harvesting and pruning.

The industry was struggling to attract new people and make sure it had enough manpower to harvest next year’s harvest and complete winter pruning.

New Zealand Winegrowers chief executive Philip Gregan said international demand was high, which is reflected in its price per liter, which also rose 4%.

Brya Ingram / Stuff

New Zealand Winegrowers chief executive Philip Gregan said international demand was high, which is reflected in its price per liter, which also rose 4%.

“The recent decision to allow non-quarantine travel for workers under the Registered Seasonal Employer Plan is a positive one, and we continue to work with the government to ensure that it is aware of the impact that labor shortages will have. ‘Work will have on our members if they are not able to attract the workforce they need, ”said Gregan.

However, businesses that sold primarily through wineries and tourism continued to face significant challenges and were a major stress point for wineries as the number of international tourists and the impact of current restrictions on regional trips have all taken their toll.

“We have seen more New Zealanders visiting the cellar doors, but there are long lean periods outside of the traditional Kiwi holiday period,” he said.

The ability to ship products to market had become a growing concern as supply chains continued to be affected by Covid-19 restrictions. Transportation costs had more than doubled and the reliability of shipments had plunged, Gregan said.